Canadians on the Camino, Day 9: Franco’s shadow

Monument to the Fallen, Alto Pedraja, Spain
Monument to the Fallen, Alto Pedraja, Spain

(September 12)

Tonight we are in a tiny village called Ages located four days of walking and about 100 kilometres beyond Logrono. Yesterday we passed from Spain’s smallest autonomous region, La Rioja, into its largest Castilla y Leon and we stayed in Belorado, population 2000.

Belorado sits at less than 800 metres but today we ascend to 1100 metres within about 15 kilometres of leaving the town. The path here has the feel of being in deep isolation although in reality one is never far from the N-120 highway.  In our 28 kilometres of walking today we come upon few villages and none containing more than 200 people. The mountains are covered by scrubby oak and pine trees and the road, which appears to be in the process of being widened here is a bed of dry reddish soil and the dust covers our shoes and legs. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 9: Franco’s shadow

Canadians on the Camino, Day 10: Long walk into Burgos  

Early morning coffee in tiny village of Ages, Spain
Early morning coffee in tiny village of Ages, Spain

(September 13)

Tonight we are in Burgos, population 150,000 and we have decided take a rest day after 10 days and more than 200 kilometres on the trail. We have about 500 kilometres remaining to reach Santiago de Compostela.

We left the tiny and run down village of Ages early and in the dark this morning. Our first stop was at a small café bar where a woman behind the counter is busily taking orders for pastries and coffee, calling out the orders to a man named Antonio who operates the coffee makers. She has flair, addressing almost every client in the queue as “mi amor”.  When I ask if I can take her photo, she gives me a lovely smile and thumbs up. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 10: Long walk into Burgos  

Canadians on the Camino, Day 11: El Cid and the Moors 

Catedral de Santa Maria in Burgos, a UNESCO site
Catedral de Santa Maria in Burgos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

(September 14)

After the tranquility of the countryside, our guidebook warns about the hustle and bustle in Burgos (population 180,000), not to mention the possibility of being overcharged or becoming the victims of theft. Actually, we are pleased to be in a city for a day or two where we walk less than on other days and rest more.

We spend most of our time in or around the Catedral de Santa Maria and nearby the Plaza Mayor. We watch people of all ages and families of various sizes taking their weekend promenade on a tree-canopied pedestrian street along the Rio Arlanzon. It lies just beyond the cathedral and through Arco de Santa Maria, a sturdy arch that served as the ancient gateway to the city. How comforting to see people enjoying themselves in that way. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 11: El Cid and the Moors 

Canadians on the Camino, Day 12: Walking the meseta

Hay fields on the high meseta near Burgos
Hay fields on the high meseta near Burgos

(September 15)

We leave Burgos early this morning and before long we are on the meseta, the large central upland plateau that covers much of the Iberian Peninsula. The meseta is in some ways similar to the high rolling prairie in the Swift Current or Maple Creek area of southern Saskatchewan. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 12: Walking the meseta

Canadians on the Camino, Day 13: Two women named Pilar

A Spanish woman named Pilar recommended this hostel in the tiny village of Ages
A Spanish woman named Pilar recommended this hostel in the tiny village of Ages

(September 16)

I have on this trip encountered two lovely women named Pilar. The name is a common and traditional one in Spain. There is even a Day of Pilar to celebrate an occasion back in 40 AD when the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to the apostle St. James (Santiago) when he was near Zaragoza in what was the Roman province of Spain. Here is my brief story of two contemporary Pilars. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 13: Two women named Pilar

Canadian churches challenged by Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Justice Murray Sinclair, TRC commission chair
Justice Murray Sinclair, TRC commission chair

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) has released a summary of its final report into the history and legacy of Indian residential schools. The first paragraph in the Introduction describes Canada’s entire Aboriginal policy and its implementation as “cultural genocide.”

The TRC defines that term as “the destruction of those structures and practices that allow the group to continue as a group.” This includes seizing lands, the forcible relocation of populations, restrictions upon movement, banning languages and spiritual practices, disrupting families and the removal of children.
This is strong language but Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and former Prime Minister Paul Martin have both used the same term in recent months. Continue reading Canadian churches challenged by Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Canadians on the Camino, Day 14: Good Samaritans at Boadilla

Good Samaritans from Korea
Good Samaritans from Korea

(September 17)

We leave the tiny village of Boadilla del Camino well before sunrise this morning, planning to get most of the day’s hike completed prior to about noon, when it gets hot. Martha has a small headlamp to show the way in the dark but the Camino signage, usually very good, is not so good this morning. We crunch our way along a gravel path and occasionally check behind us to see if there are others on the same path. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 14: Good Samaritans at Boadilla

Canadians on the Camino, Day 15: Roman roads

Old Roman road on Spanish meseta
Old Roman road on Spanish meseta

(September 18)

We leave Carrion de Los Condes early this morning for another day in the open country of the meseta and we walk for 27 kilometres, encountering only two small villages along the way. We end the day at a modern hotel just outside of tiny village called Terradillos de Los Templarios.

Roman engineering

After an initial stretch of walking on or alongside a secondary paved road, we come upon a gravel road called Via Aquitana, which was built by the Romans 2,000 years ago. What remains of it runs straight as an arrow for seven kilometres.  According to our guidebook, all of the rock to support the road would  have been hauled in because this is an area of bogs. Two days back, near the town of Castrojerez, we walked on a trail parallel to a remaining portion of a Roman aqueduct, which is another amazing feat of engineering. The Romans left a big engineering footprint in France, Portugal, Spain and even the current day British Isles. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 15: Roman roads