Truth and Reconciliation in Canada: the road ahead

Justice Murray Sinclair, TRC chair, Art Babych photo
Justice Murray Sinclair, TRC chair, Art Babych photo

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will release its final report into the history and legacy of Indian residential schools on June 2. There is very little suspense about what the three commissioners think about the schools: they were an aggressively assimilationist policy at best and genocidal at worst.

That much was signalled in the TRC’s interim report in 2012 and in recent comments made by commission chair Justice Murray Sinclair. More telling in the report will be what the commission has to say about the way forward. If ever there is to be true reconciliation, Canadians will have to acknowledge and repent for an ugly and enduring episode in our history.
Continue reading Truth and Reconciliation in Canada: the road ahead

Canadians on the Camino, Day 11: El Cid and the Moors 

Catedral de Santa Maria in Burgos, a UNESCO site
Catedral de Santa Maria in Burgos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

(September 14)

After the tranquility of the countryside, our guidebook warns about the hustle and bustle in Burgos (population 180,000), not to mention the possibility of being overcharged or becoming the victims of theft. Actually, we are pleased to be in a city for a day or two where we walk less than on other days and rest more.

We spend most of our time in or around the Catedral de Santa Maria and nearby the Plaza Mayor. We watch people of all ages and families of various sizes taking their weekend promenade on a tree-canopied pedestrian street along the Rio Arlanzon. It lies just beyond the cathedral and through Arco de Santa Maria, a sturdy arch that served as the ancient gateway to the city. How comforting to see people enjoying themselves in that way. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 11: El Cid and the Moors 

Canadians on the Camino, Day 10: Long walk into Burgos  

Early morning coffee in tiny village of Ages, Spain
Early morning coffee in tiny village of Ages, Spain

(September 13)

Tonight we are in Burgos, population 150,000 and we have decided take a rest day after 10 days and more than 200 kilometres on the trail. We have about 500 kilometres remaining to reach Santiago de Compostela.

We left the tiny and run down village of Ages early and in the dark this morning. Our first stop was at a small café bar where a woman behind the counter is busily taking orders for pastries and coffee, calling out the orders to a man named Antonio who operates the coffee makers. She has flair, addressing almost every client in the queue as “mi amor”.  When I ask if I can take her photo, she gives me a lovely smile and thumbs up. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 10: Long walk into Burgos  

Canadians on the Camino, Day 9: Franco’s shadow

Monument to the Fallen, Alto Pedraja, Spain
Monument to the Fallen, Alto Pedraja, Spain

(September 12)

Tonight we are in a tiny village called Ages located four days of walking and about 100 kilometres beyond Logrono. Yesterday we passed from Spain’s smallest autonomous region, La Rioja, into its largest Castilla y Leon and we stayed in Belorado, population 2000.

Belorado sits at less than 800 metres but today we ascend to 1100 metres within about 15 kilometres of leaving the town. The path here has the feel of being in deep isolation although in reality one is never far from the N-120 highway.  In our 28 kilometres of walking today we come upon few villages and none containing more than 200 people. The mountains are covered by scrubby oak and pine trees and the road, which appears to be in the process of being widened here is a bed of dry reddish soil and the dust covers our shoes and legs. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 9: Franco’s shadow

Canadians on the Camino, Day 7: Marian devotion and Sister Adoración

 

Spain is steeped in Marian devotion
Spain is steeped in Marian devotion

(September 10)

Tonight we are comfortably housed in Santo Domingo de la Calzada, a charming town of 6,600. It has its share of accommodation for pilgrims, some of it dating back to the 11th century. The Cistercian nuns run a crowded albergue with a shaded terrace and garden but we noticed in our guide book that just around the corner they also operate a modern hostel and that is where we booked into a private room.

In these past days we have walked through vineyards and then into more open farm country where we have seen brown stubble fields and stacks of hay bales reminiscent of rural Western Canada. The skies, too, remind one of the Canadian prairies, with long vistas and grey cumulus clouds floating in the dazzling blue. Yesterday, we came across a shepherd and his dog herding perhaps 100 sheep through a stubble field and across the gravel trail just in front of us. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 7: Marian devotion and Sister Adoración

Canadians on the Camino, Day 6: Who walks the Way?

Pilgrims enjoying dinner in Logrono
Pilgrims enjoying dinner in Logrono

(September 09)

The Camino de Santiago is a centuries old pilgrimage in the tradition of the Catholic Church. Today people walk it for a variety of reasons and in many, if not most, cases those reasons may not be religious. Through repeated encounters on the trail and in the streets, restaurants and bars in towns, one achieves a quick acquaintance with a variety of people. Who are they and why are they here?

I should mention that in these observations I am piggy backing on the skills and curiosity of my wife Martha, who frequently asks personal questions with a disarming frankness. She asks people why they are walking.  I just hang around and listen. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 6: Who walks the Way?

Canadians on the Camino, Day 5: Blisters underfoot

Early morning in farm country near Los Arcos, Spain
Early morning in farm country near Los Arcos, Spain

(September 08)

This is another day that begins with walking before dawn. We have a fast coffee and some wholesome brown bread at the albergue in Los Arcos and head off into the open farm country. It is quiet at this time of day and the light over the fields and hills becomes wonderfully soft prior to sunrise. Continue reading Canadians on the Camino, Day 5: Blisters underfoot

Hard Facts: An Index on Indian Residential Schools

Residential School, [Fort] Resolution, N.W.T.
Students at R.C. Indian Residential School, [Fort] Resolution, N.W.T.
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will isue its final report on June 2, 2015.  The TRC was established in 2008 as a part of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement and its mandate is to provide Canadians with the truth about the history and legacy of Indian residential schools run by the government and by Canadian churches on the government’s behalf for more than 130 years.

The TRC was also asked to inspire a process leading toward reconciliation within Aboriginal families, and between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal communities, churches, governments, and Canadians in general.

Here are some facts regarding the residential schools, told in the form of an Index: Continue reading Hard Facts: An Index on Indian Residential Schools