Cindy Blackstock’s victory for First Nations children

Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society.
Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society.

Since the June release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s preliminary report on the history of Indian residential schools, there has been heightened talk about how non-Indigenous Canadians can become better neighbours to those who are indigenous. Now, a ruling issued by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) on January 26 provides yet another illustration of the shared road ahead. Continue reading Cindy Blackstock’s victory for First Nations children

Great Canadian Speeches, Nellie McClung and the vote for women

Nellie McClung
Nellie McClung

Women received the vote in Manitoba 100 years ago, in January 1916, and it did not happen by accident.  Nellie McClung and others were forced to take an overtly political route to get there. McClung was well known in western Canada as a writer and an activist for women’s rights. On 27 January 1914, Manitoba Premier Rodmond Roblin and members of the legislature met with McClung and a delegation of several hundred from the Political Equality League, which was seeking the vote for women. Roblin treated them condescendingly, and flatly refused them, saying, “I believe woman suffrage would break up the home and send women to mix up in political meetings.” The following evening McClung and others turned that meeting into a piece of guerrilla theatre. McClung played the premier’s role and mimicked his inflated rhetoric in a mock speech which she made to a fictitious group of men appearing before women legislators asking for the right to vote. McClung’s oration is one of those contained in my book Great Canadian Speeches.   Continue reading Great Canadian Speeches, Nellie McClung and the vote for women

Trudeau’s honeymoon, he over-promised and under-delivers

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo by Art Babych
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo by Art Babych

Our usually hard bitten media pundits are predicting that Justin Trudeau’s political honeymoon may continue for many months, but I believe that it’s time to begin holding the Liberals to account.

Admittedly there has been a significant shift in tone for which Trudeau deserves credit. He is far more open than was Stephen Harper and he has, for example, met with the premiers, Indigenous leaders, the labour movement and many others who mostly received a back of the hand from the Harper government. Continue reading Trudeau’s honeymoon, he over-promised and under-delivers

A gift they gave me long ago

Lessons for life: A nun teaches me to type on an old Underwood
Lessons for life on an old Underwood

This is not a Christmas story exactly but it is about a gift that was given to me by three people and so it fits with the mood and the season of giving. The story involves a big black Underwood typewriter and the memory of that gleaming old monster was triggered this week when I saw an antique in a used bookstore in my city neighbourhood. Continue reading A gift they gave me long ago

Stephen Harper is gone, a weight is lifted

Justice Murray Sinclair (centre right) hopes the Trudeau government will act on TRC recommendations
Justice Murray Sinclair (centre right) hopes the Trudeau government will act on TRC recommendations

The recent Canadian federal election which thrust Justin Trudeau and the Liberals into power was, depending upon your point of view, either a happy day or an exercise in the politics of resentment. For many people who I have encountered since October 19 it is as if a dark cloud has passed or a weight has been lifted from their shoulders. Continue reading Stephen Harper is gone, a weight is lifted

2015 Canadian Election, a guide for rookie MPs

Welcoming Rookie MPs
Welcoming Rookie MPs. Image from The Hill Times

There is nothing quite like the euphoria that a newly-elected MP feels after the grind of a nomination and then a demanding election campaign. What a privilege it is to be chosen by your constituents to serve them and our country.  However, your life as an MP will likely be less glamorous than it might at first appear. Continue reading 2015 Canadian Election, a guide for rookie MPs

Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ and the challenges ahead

Justin Trudeau’s “sunny ways”. Photo by Wikimedia Commons, Alex Guibord
Justin Trudeau’s “sunny ways”. Photo by Wikimedia Commons, Alex Guibord

As Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau stood before an election night crowd in Montreal on October 19, he quoted former Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier, saying: “Sunny ways my friends, sunny ways.”  Referring to his Liberal party’s convincing upset victory in capturing 184 seats, well beyond the 99 for the Conservatives and 44 for the NDP, Trudeau said, “This is what positive politics can do.” Continue reading Justin Trudeau’s ‘sunny ways’ and the challenges ahead

Racism in the Canadian election, suppressing our better angels

Syrian refugees cross from Hungary into Austria on their way to Germany in September 2015. Photo by Mstyslav Chernov/Wikimedia Commons
Syrian refugees cross from Hungary into Austria on their way to Germany in September 2015. Photo by Mstyslav Chernov/Wikimedia Commons

The main issue in the Canadian election was supposed to be who could best manage the economy. Prime Minister Stephen Harper claims that it’s he, and warns that other political parties will run deficits and raise taxes. Of course, Harper ran six deficits in a row. Apparently, he runs good deficits but it would be irresponsible for others to do the same. Continue reading Racism in the Canadian election, suppressing our better angels